Tag Archives: change

What McDonald’s can teach us about recovery

Gästinlägg av Mats Lederhausen

BouncingBack

With all the news coverage today on financial mismanagement, I can tell you from first-hand experience that there is one company that continues to prosper amid all the chaos. And I think it is worth trying to understand why.

I have spent most of my career inside McDonald’s. First, as a crew member, peeling potatoes and flipping burgers in my native Stockholm, Sweden; then, as most McDonald’s executives, advancing through the ranks and learning the tricks of the trade through marketing, training, HR and operations. After nearly 10 years at the helm of the Swedish operations, I moved to the U.S. to assume the role of chief strategy officer.

This was a time when McDonald’s was facing its toughest headwind in the history of the company. Some of it was self-inflicted; some of it was just evolutionary. Most institutions die young, as they fail to reinvent themselves.

As we celebrate the 200th anniversary of Darwin, it is important to remind ourselves that only the most adaptable species indeed survive. So it didn’t come as a real surprise that after decades of unsurpassed growth rates, even McDonald’s would stall. It happens to almost everyone. But as I studied the corporate history books, I realized that the rather short list of companies that had reinvented themselves was intimidating and certainly humbling.

At McDonald’s, we tried many things. Some might say, too many things. But at least we tried them with a sincere intention to find our “inner voice” again.

The job as chief strategist in times of rediscovery is closer to “corporate psychiatrist/philosopher” than traditional strategist. Your tools are less about spreadsheets and data and more about introspection and deep discovery. If you once were successful, chances are that somewhere in the past are also the building blocks of your future. Your job is to find whatever it was that connected you to your audience in the past and then to adjust it to be more relevant in today’s marketplace — without losing its essential connectivity.

Fortunately, there were many people wanting us to succeed. But there were also many, often loud, voices that couldn’t wait to see us fail. Perhaps, they inspired us to try harder. Few things motivate us as much as proving the cynics wrong.

What emerged out of years of hard work were two important insights. Both are simple and powerful.

The first was that there was really nothing wrong with the original premise of our business model. As our chief marketing officer at the time, Larry Light, said: “The time we need a new business model is when we believe that our customers no longer ‘Deserve a Break Today’.” Clearly, in today’s time-starved landscape, this was not the case.

The second insight was that we had confused size with success. Over time, we started to believe that one more restaurant meant “job well done.” And sooner rather than later, all our metrics, all of our incentives and all of our capital were chasing growth — the bad form of growth: growth from quantity, not quality.

As we dug in, we realized that growth must be “deserved” in order to be sustainable. As long as you are getting better, it is good to get bigger. But if you are buying size, particularly at the cost of quality, then you are on a slippery and ultimately unsustainable slope.

In 2003, we launched our new strategy, “Growth from being better.” We aligned the entire company around this very simple idea. Human and financial resources were now being directed at truly improving, not just increasing, their activities.

The rest is really history. The turnaround of McDonald’s has been a remarkable one. To many observers, it was a bit of a surprise. To others, perhaps their own worst nightmare.

To me, it has been a labor of love for a few reasons. First, McDonald’s is an important company. Its success matters to so many — particularly the hundreds of thousands (probably millions) of people who get their first job there and who learn critical skills for life. Secondly, McDonald’s is a decentralized company. It is really a system of companies — thousands of them. Most of them are small entrepreneurs who have invested their savings in a dream to be in business for themselves, but not by themselves. And finally, McDonald’s restaurants serve almost 60 million daily breaks of great value. People depend on getting food served fast. Food they can trust, and food they can afford. What’s even better, McDonald’s is committed to offering more and more healthier choices on its menu and has made significant changes to its line up of “better-for-you” choices in the past few years.

I believe there are important lessons that can be learned from the remarkable turnaround at McDonald’s.

1. How you grow matters as much as that you grow.
Our financial services industry would have benefitted from a focus on “growth by quality, not by quantity”. Clearly, the “growth at any cost” credo of some led to exactly that: any cost.

2. Changing your business model may not be needed, but belief in it is.
Start by asking yourself what business you are in and whether customers still have a need for it. If they do, commit to it — fully. At McDonald’s, we knew that people still “deserved a break today” and they were willing to let go of all other initiatives (many of them very exciting) in order to demonstrate unwavering commitment to the core business.

3. None of us is as good as all of us. It’s the system, stupid!
Large businesses, the financial system and the government are all complex systems. They are not top-down. They are colorful and integrated tapestries spun together by cultural, geographical, ethnic and historical threads. Understanding that you are leading a system, not a company or a person, is a critical insight if you want to successfully change something large. McDonald’s is extremely good at this. To some people (me included), it is a frustrating process. It takes time. It requires buy-in and plenty of patience and tolerance from everyone. It also requires adequate policing, oversight and incredibly detailed measurement systems. This is tedious work, and intimidating to those being measured. But it’s needed.

Large systems work best with a hard-wired operating system in the hub that enables innovation, entrepreneurship and decision-making in the nodes. The Internet would not have happened without HTML. The U.S. would not have prospered without the Constitution. But it is worth all the pain. And it must start with the humility that you are in the service of something larger than your own institution. As we say at BE-CAUSE — the company I founded — a purpose bigger than your product.

4. Plan your work, and work your plan.
At McDonald’s we created a “plan to win.” Some would argue that it wasn’t perfect. Perhaps it wasn’t, but we decided that it was. And we haven’t looked back. Even through tragic circumstances — losing two CEOs in less than one year due to tragic deaths — the plan stayed intact and is still central today to the focus and alignment of the organization.

So often, companies feel a need to change something for the sake of changing it. I say, “If it works, don’t change it.”

_

This post was originally published at LRN’s Hows Matter.

Den största dagen i marknadsföringens historia

Favorit i Repris 2 | Ursprungligen publicerad den 6 januari 2009

Ta en relativt okänd man. Yngre än alla hans motståndare. Svart. Och med ett mycket illa klingande namn.

Betänk att hans första motståndare var den mest kända kvinnan i USA, med mycket nära förbindelse till en av de mest framgångsrika levande politikerna. Betänk därefter att hans andra motståndare var en välkänd och hyllad krigshjälte, med lång och enastående karriär som senator.

Inget av det spelade någon roll. Barack Hussein Obama hade nämligen en bättre marknadsföringsstrategi: ”Change”.

Obama_change

Propagandanazisten Joseph Goebbels var en mästare på ”den stora lögnen”. Enligt Goebbels gällde regeln: ”Om du berättar en tillräckligt stor lögn tillräckligt ofta, kommer folk till slut att tro på den”.

Motsatsstrategin är ”den stora sanningen”. Om du upprepar sanningen tillräckligt ofta blir den större och större, och får till slut en aura av legitimitet och autenticitet.

Äg rätt ord
Vilket ord ägde Hillary Clinton? Först försökte hon ta ägarskap för ordet ”Experience”. Men när hon bevittnade Obamas framgångar bytte hon snabbt till ”Countdown to Change”. När kritikerna påpekade hennes me-too-grepp, bytte hon till ”Solutions for America.”

Vilket ord förknippas Hillary Clinton med idag? Jag har ingen aning. Har du?

Och sen har vi John McCain. En artikel i New York Times den 26 oktober hade rubriken ”The Making (and Remaking and Remaking) of the Candidate.” I den listades en del av de etiketter McCain associerades med: ”Conservative”. ”Maverick” (politisk vilde). ”Hero”. ”Straight talker”. ”Commander”. ”Bipartisan conciliator” (tvåpartimedlare). ”Experienced leader”. ”Patriot”.

Underrubriken löd ungefär som följer: ”Om en kampanj inte kan enas kring en central beskrivning, drabbas inte då dess huvudperson?”

Det McCain till slut valde var ”Country first”. Men dels kom fokusering på tok för sent, dels var det en slogan som medelväljaren hade svårt att förstå innebörden av.

På ett taktiskt plan försökte dessutom både Ms. Clinton och Mr. McCain förmedla ett budskap som mer eller mindre handlade om att ”jag kan genomföra förändringar bättre än min motståndare”.
Problemet är att ”Bättre” aldrig fungerar inom marknadsföring. Det som fungerar är ”Annorlunda”. För det är först när du är annorlunda som kan du spärra ditt koncept i människors medvetande, så att konkurrenterna aldrig kan ta det ifrån dig.

Se bara vad ”Driving” har gjort för BMW. Finns det bilar som är roligare att köra än en BMW? Förmodligen. Men det spelar ingen roll, eftersom BMW äger positionen ”driving” i människors medvetande. Det sorgliga är att det endast finns ett fåtal varumärken som äger ord eller fraser i människors medvetande, men att de flesta av dem inte använder dem som sin slogan.  Mercedes-Benz äger ”Prestige”, men använder det inte som slogan. Toyota äger ”Reliability”, men använder det inte som slogan. Coca-Cola äger ”The real thing”, men använder det inte som slogan. Pepsi-Cola äger ”Pepsi generation”, men använder det inte som slogan.

Faktum är, att de flesta varumärken följer Pepsis mönster. Varje gång en ny marknadsdirektör anställs, eller varje gång Pepsi väljer en ny reklambyrå, lanseras också en ny slogan. Sedan 1975 har BMW använt 1 slogan: ”The ultimate driving machine”. Sedan 1975 har Pepsi-Cola haft 14 olika slogans.

Enkelt, konsekvent, relevant
Obama-kampanjen har alltså en hel del att lära ut.

1. Enkelt. Omkring 70% av USA:s befolkning anser att landet är på väg i fel riktning. Därav Obamas fokus på ”Change”. Varför tänkte inte begåvade politiker som Hillary Clinton och John McCain på det konceptet?

Baserat på min erfarenhet av styrelserummen i USA är ”Förändring” en alltför enkel idé för att kunna säljas in. Företagsledningar söker efter kommunikationskoncept som är fyndiga. Alla pengar som företagsledningen spenderar, borde resultera i något som de själva inte hade kunnat komma på. Förhoppningsvis något särdeles fyndigt. Tyvärr kommer dessa fyndiga fraser ytterst sällan att bidra till att utveckla företagets affärer på samma sätt som ”Change” bidrog till framgången för Obamas kampanj. De är helt enkelt inte tillräckligt enkla.

2. Konsekvent. Vad är felet med 90% av all reklam? Jo, företag som försöker ”kommunicera” istället för att ”positionera”.

Obamas mål var inte att kommunicera det faktum att han var en företrädare för förändring. Så som världen ser ut idag, betraktar alla politiker som kandiderar för de högsta ämbeten sig själva som företrädare för förändring. Det Obama i stället gjorde, var att upprepa ”Change”-budskapet om och om igen, vilket resulterade i att de potentiella väljarna till slut förknippade honom med just det konceptet. Med andra ord: Han äger ”Change”-idén i väljarnas medvetande.

I dagens över-kommunicerade samhälle krävs ändlös repetition för att uppnå den här effekten. För ett typiskt konsumentvarumärke, innebär det år av kommunikation och hundratals miljoner dollar. Men de flesta företag har varken pengarna, tålamodet eller visionen för att uppnå det Obama lyckades med. De hoppar från ett budskap till ett annat i hopp om att snubbla över den magiska formeln som sätter fart på varumärket. Det fungerar inte idag. Och det är särdeles ineffektivt för en politiker, eftersom det skapar en aura av vacklande och obeslutsamhet — katastrofala kvalitéer för den som vill kliva uppåt på den politiska stegen.

Det enda som fungerar idag är BMW:s approach. Konsekvens, konsekvens, konsekvens — över årtionden, om inte ännu längre. Men det får inte vara med en tråkig slogan. Hitachi har använt ”Inspiring the next” som slogan så länge jag kan minnas, men utan framgång. Effektiva slogans måste vara enkla och förankrade i verkligheten. Vad ”nästa” har Hitachi någonsin ”inspirerat”? Rött bläck, möjligtvis.

3. Relevant. ”Om du håller på att förlora slaget, flytta slagfältet” är ett gammalt militärt axiom som i lika hög grad gäller marknadsföring. Genom sin obevekliga fokus på förändring flyttade Barack Obama det politiska slagfältet. Han tvingade sina motståndare att ägna en stor del av sina kampanjer till att diskutera vilka förändringar de föreslog för nationen. Och hur dessa förändringar skilde sig från de han själv föreslog. Allt tal om ”förändring” avledde både Clinton och McCain från deras egna styrkor: deras track record, erfarenhet och relationer med politiska ledare världen över.

Vad hände med Change
Barack Obama blev (ironiskt nog?) vald till Advertising Age:s Årets Marknadsförare, av marknadsförarna som närvarade på Association of National Advertisers årliga konferens i Orlando i oktober. Men man undrar om dessa CMO:s har fattat budskapet.

Eller, som en marknadsdirektör sa: ”Jag betraktar det som något vi alla kan dra lärdom av som marknadsförare. Att se vad han gjort: lyckats skapa ett socialt nätverk och göra det på ett sätt som gjorde det lätt för människor att engagera sig. Det var mycket enkelt för människor att delta.”

Och vad hände med ”Change”?

_

Joakim Jardenberg tangerar ämnet i inlägget: Det är nu det händer.
Inlägget är en fri översättning från en krönika i AdAge av Al Ries.

Hjärnan gillar slogans

Minns du Canons slogan ”Kan nån, kan Canon”?

Trots att det snart är 20 år sedan den användes minns många den än idag. Precis som IKEAs ”Inte för de rika – men för de kloka”.

Vilka slogans minns du?

Förmodligen kan du koppla ihop nedanstående slogans med rätt varumärke. Men vilket år tror du att respektive slogan lanserades? (Rätt svar hittar du i slutet på inlägget.)

  • Think different
  • Just do it
  • Don’t leave home without it
  • Probably the best beer in the world
  • Because I’m worth it

Jag erkänner villigt att jag länge ansåg slogans vara något töntigt, något som förringade varumärket eller företaget. Kanske berodde det på att jag i början av min reklambana ofta fick höra kommentaren ”Jaså, du jobbar med reklam; då skriver du slogans och sånt”. Jag tyckte då att det förringade mitt arbete som copywriter.

im_lovin_itIdag vet jag bättre. En slogan som fastnar i hjärnan är förmodligen det bästa vapnet i reklamens positioneringsarsenal. Och med ”fastnar” syftar jag inte på att människor bara minns en slogan, utan att den etsas in – ”hårdkodas” – i minnescellerna. För när det har skett, finns den nämligen kvar där för alltid.

Låt mig ge ett exempel. Vi tror att den franska revolutionen enades kring stridsropet ”Liberté, égalité, fraternité”. Faktum är att det vid tiden för revolutionen fanns ett stort antal olika stridsrop. Det var inte förrän i mitten på 1800-talet, alltså långt efter revolutionen, som ”Liberté, égalité, fraternité” blev en officiell slogan. Det var det enda stridsropet som fastnade. Därför är det också den enda slogan vi idag förknippar med franska revolutionen. (Ordet slogan härstammar f.ö. från Gaelliskans sluagh-ghairm, som betyder armé eller strid och rop eller skrik – alltså ”stridsrop”.)

Gerry Spence, den kanske mest framgångsrike brottmålsadvokaten någonsin, lär ska ha fått frågan hur det kom sig att han inte förlorat en enda rättegång på 41 år. ”Jag bestämmer mig inte för att ta mig an en klient förrän jag formulerat ett slagord som jag kan upprepa under hela rättegången, och som jag kan sammanfatta min slutplädering med” påstås han ha svarat. Han hade lärt sig vilket genomslag en stark slogan kan ha. En slogan som sammanfattar hela storyn i ett enda huvudargument.

Vid ett av hans omtalade fall berättade han en historia om en man som köpte och tog hem ett lejon. Djuret rymde och anföll grannen, som skadades mycket svårt. Den storyn symboliserade, menade han, vad företaget Kerr-McGee gjort sig skyldigt till genom att lagra farliga kemikalier på sin mark. “If the lion gets away, Kerr-McGee must pay”. Och så blev det. Samma strategi användes f.ö. av Johnnie Cochran i O.J. Simpson-fallet: “If it doesn’t fit, you must acquit”.

labour_isnt_workingDen här formen av ”klistriga” slogans bygger på alliteration – t.ex. Lexus ”The passionate pursuit of perfection”. En annan klistrig form är dubbelbetydelser. Min absoluta favorit i kategorin är den slogan som Saatchi & Saatchi kläckte för Conservative Party inför det brittiska valet 1979: ”Labour isn’t working”. Margaret Thatcher vann valet. Och så har vi Fresh Direct, ett amerikanskt företag som levererar mat hem till dörren: “Our food is fresh. Our customers are spoiled”. En tredje form av slogans är motsatsalternativ. ”To be or not to be: that is the question” är förmodligen det mest kända exemplet inom litteraturen. Hotellkedjan Holiday Inn använde länge ”The best surprise is no surprise”.

Men den sannolikt viktigaste framgångsfaktorn är repetition och uthållighet. Neuroforskarna Giep Franzen och Margot Bouwman menar t.ex. att hårdkodning i hjärnan tar minst två år av frekvent repeterad stimuli. Och i dagens mediebrus, där repetitionen riskerar att drunkna i alla andra budskap, krävs förmodligen betydligt längre tid. Dessutom: ju mer sällan du repeterar, desto längre tid tar det.

Alltså fastnar heller inte de slogans som byts ut i samma takt som reklambyrån eller marknadschefen byts ut.

Ha gärna dessa råd och exempel i minnet när du ska formulera en slogan. Men glöm inte att den måste ha en enkel och tydlig koppling till produktens idé, viktigaste nytta eller egenskap. Och att den måste vara mer emotionell än rationell samt skriven på målgruppens språk. Annars accepteras den helt enkelt inte av målgruppens hjärnor.

Läs även inlägget om hur Barack Obama framgångsrikt utnyttjade slagordet ”change” under presidentvalskampanjen.

Och håll utkik efter ett kommande inlägg om hur slogans, varumärken och reklambudskap lagras i och bearbetas av hjärnan.

_
Tillägg:
Nu finns inlägget “Var i hjärnan skapas varumärken?” här. Läs det, det är intressant.

Think different, Apple, 1997 | Just do it, Nike, 1988 | Don’t leave home without it, American Express, 1975 | Probably the best beer in the world, Carlsberg, 1973 | Because I’m worth it, L’Oreal, 1967 | Inspiration finns även att hämta i Advertising Slogan Hall of Fame.

Bush var värdelös, Obama klarar allt.

Gästinlägg av Sten Jansson

barack-obama1I tisdags hoppade jag över kvällspasset på gymmet.

Jag stannade hemma och tittade på Barack Obamas installationstal istället. Den nye presidenten hade en snygg röd slips och en välsydd överrock.

Minst en miljon människor fanns på plats framför Capitolium i ett kylslaget Washington, kanske upp mot en miljard i hyddor, på barer och i slott runt om i världen.

I över ett års tid har Barack skickat mejl till mig. Varje vecka har han bett om fem dollar till sin kampanj och frågat om jag inte kan köpa en t-shirt av honom.
.
Fem dollar var ett tag under provvalskampanjen 28 kr, nu är det 43 kr. På t-shirten stod det CHANGE.

Barack länkade mig alltid vidare till You Tube så att jag kunde lyssna på vad han hade på hjärtat. I början tyckte jag han hade mycket att säga. Jag försökte t o m lära mig några meningar utantill och härma hans djupa basstämma.

I sitt installationstal stakade han sig inte en enda gång. Talet tog 20 minuter. Det såg ut som om han framförde det utan manus.

”Det är inte sant”, sa jag högt hemma i soffan till mig själv. ”Ingen kan lära sig en sådan lång text utantill.”

Det var inte sant heller fick jag reda på i efterhand. Han hade hjälp av någon ny typ av osynlig skärm som texten rullade fram på.

Men ok, lite lurad får man väl bli.

Inför hela världen stod här en man som ska fixa finanskrisen, få GM, Ford och Chrysler på fötter, se till att det blir fred i Mellanöstern, hjälpa de fattiga i Bronx och på Chicagos South Side.

Om ett år när ännu fler banker har gått omkull, när inga nya säljbara bilar har kommit från Detroit, när Israel undrar om de ska trycka till Hamas en gång till och när soppköken i de fattiga svarta stadsdelarna finns kvar, kan vi alla precis som Kim Larsen sjunga:

”Hva gør vi nu, lille du.”

Kanske kommer vi i januari nästa år att ha en annan syn på den nye presidenten. Och kanske blir det då dags att omvärdera den gamle presidenten.

Du minns väl honom, han som var så värdelös.

George W. Bush.

Sten Jansson har varit projektledare och VD för flera reklambyråer, bl a b2b-byrån Anderson & Lembke i Göteborg. För drygt tjugo år sedan skrev han “Första boken – 19 snabblektioner i reklam och marknadsföring”. Boken såldes på några år i närmare 40.000 exemplar, något av ett rekord för marknadsföringslitteratur i Sverige.

Den största dagen i marknadsföringens historia.

I en krönika i branschtidningen Advertising Age, presenterade positioneringsgurun Al Ries nyligen huvudskälet till varför Barack Obama vann det amerikanska presidentvalet. I sin underrubrik skrev han att ”den 4 november 2008 kommer att gå till historien som den största dagen någonsin i marknadsföringens historia”.

Här följer en något förkortad och tämligen fri översättning.

Ta en relativt okänd man. Yngre än alla hans motståndare. Svart. Och med ett mycket illa klingande namn.

Betänk att hans första motståndare var den mest kända kvinnan i USA, med mycket nära förbindelse till en av de mest framgångsrika levande politikerna. Betänk därefter att hans andra motståndare var en välkänd och hyllad krigshjälte, med lång och enastående karriär som senator.

Inget av det spelade någon roll. Barack Hussein Obama hade nämligen en bättre marknadsföringsstrategi: ”Change”.

Propagandanazisten Joseph Goebbels var en mästare på ”den stora lögnen”. Enligt Goebbels gällde regeln: ”Om du berättar en tillräckligt stor lögn tillräckligt ofta, kommer folk till slut att tro på den”.

Motsatsstrategin är ”den stora sanningen”. Om du upprepar sanningen tillräckligt ofta blir den större och större, och får till slut en aura av legitimitet och autenticitet.

Äg rätt ord
Vilket ord ägde Hillary Clinton? Först försökte hon ta ägarskap för ordet ”Experience”. Men när hon bevittnade Obamas framgångar bytte hon snabbt till ”Countdown to Change”. När kritikerna påpekade hennes me-too-grepp, bytte hon till ”Solutions for America.”

Vilket ord förknippas Hillary Clinton med idag? Jag har ingen aning. Har du?

Och sen har vi John McCain. En artikel i New York Times den 26 oktober hade rubriken ”The Making (and Remaking and Remaking) of the Candidate.” I den listades en del av de etiketter McCain associerades med: ”Conservative”. ”Maverick” (politisk vilde). ”Hero”. ”Straight talker”. ”Commander”. ”Bipartisan conciliator” (tvåpartimedlare). ”Experienced leader”. ”Patriot”.

Underrubriken löd ungefär som följer: ”Om en kampanj inte kan enas kring en central beskrivning, drabbas inte då dess huvudperson?”

Det McCain till slut valde var ”Country first”. Men dels kom fokusering på tok för sent, dels var det en slogan som medelväljaren hade svårt att förstå innebörden av.

På ett taktiskt plan försökte dessutom både Ms. Clinton och Mr. McCain förmedla ett budskap som mer eller mindre handlade om att ”jag kan genomföra förändringar bättre än min motståndare”.
Problemet är att ”Bättre” aldrig fungerar inom marknadsföring. Det som fungerar är ”Annorlunda”. För det är först när du är annorlunda som kan du spärra ditt koncept i människors medvetande, så att konkurrenterna aldrig kan ta det ifrån dig.

Se bara vad ”Driving” har gjort för BMW. Finns det bilar som är roligare att köra än en BMW? Förmodligen. Men det spelar ingen roll, eftersom BMW äger positionen ”driving” i människors medvetande. Det sorgliga är att det endast finns ett fåtal varumärken som äger ord eller fraser i människors medvetande, men att de flesta av dem inte använder dem som sin slogan.  Mercedes-Benz äger ”Prestige”, men använder det inte som slogan. Toyota äger ”Reliability”, men använder det inte som slogan. Coca-Cola äger ”The real thing”, men använder det inte som slogan. Pepsi-Cola äger ”Pepsi generation”, men använder det inte som slogan.

Faktum är, att de flesta varumärken följer Pepsis mönster. Varje gång en ny marknadsdirektör anställs, eller varje gång Pepsi väljer en ny reklambyrå, lanseras också en ny slogan. Sedan 1975 har BMW använt 1 slogan: ”The ultimate driving machine”. Sedan 1975 har Pepsi-Cola haft 14 olika slogans.

Enkelt, konsekvent, relevant
Obama-kampanjen har alltså en hel del att lära ut.

1. Enkelhet. Omkring 70% av USA:s befolkning anser att landet är på väg i fel riktning. Därav Obamas fokus på ”Change”. Varför tänkte inte begåvade politiker som Hillary Clinton och John McCain på det konceptet?

Baserat på min erfarenhet av styrelserummen i USA är ”Förändring” en alltför enkel idé för att kunna säljas in. Företagsledningar söker efter kommunikationskoncept som är fyndiga. Alla pengar som företagsledningen spenderar, borde resultera i något som de själva inte hade kunnat komma på. Förhoppningsvis något särdeles fyndigt. Tyvärr kommer dessa fyndiga fraser ytterst sällan att bidra till att utveckla företagets affärer på samma sätt som ”Change” bidrog till framgången för Obamas kampanj. De är helt enkelt inte tillräckligt enkla.

2. Konsekvens. Vad är felet med 90% av all reklam? Jo, företag som försöker ”kommunicera” istället för att ”positionera”.

Obamas mål var inte att kommunicera det faktum att han var en företrädare för förändring. Så som världen ser ut idag, betraktar alla politiker som kandiderar för de högsta ämbeten sig själva som företrädare för förändring. Det Obama i stället gjorde, var att upprepa ”Change”-budskapet om och om igen, vilket resulterade i att de potentiella väljarna till slut förknippade honom med just det konceptet. Med andra ord: Han äger ”Change”-idén i väljarnas medvetande.

I dagens över-kommunicerade samhälle krävs ändlös repetition för att uppnå den här effekten. För ett typiskt konsumentvarumärke, innebär det år av kommunikation och hundratals miljoner dollar. Men de flesta företag har varken pengarna, tålamodet eller visionen för att uppnå det Obama lyckades med. De hoppar från ett budskap till ett annat i hopp om att snubbla över den magiska formeln som sätter fart på varumärket. Det fungerar inte idag. Och det är särdeles ineffektivt för en politiker, eftersom det skapar en aura av vacklande och obeslutsamhet — katastrofala kvalitéer för den som vill kliva uppåt på den politiska stegen.

Det enda som fungerar idag är BMW:s approach. Konsekvens, konsekvens, konsekvens — över årtionden, om inte ännu längre. Men det får inte vara med en tråkig slogan. Hitachi har använt ”Inspiring the next” som slogan så länge jag kan minnas, men utan framgång. Effektiva slogans måste vara enkla och förankrade i verkligheten. Vad ”nästa” har Hitachi någonsin ”inspirerat”? Rött bläck, möjligtvis.

3. Relevans. ”Om du håller på att förlora slaget, flytta slagfältet” är ett gammalt militärt axiom som i lika hög grad gäller marknadsföring. Genom sin obevekliga fokus på förändring flyttade Barack Obama det politiska slagfältet. Han tvingade sina motståndare att ägna en stor del av sina kampanjer till att diskutera vilka förändringar de föreslog för nationen. Och hur dessa förändringar skilde sig från de han själv föreslog. Allt tal om ”förändring” avledde både Clinton och McCain från deras egna styrkor: deras track record, erfarenhet och relationer med politiska ledare världen över.

Vad hände med Change
Barack Obama blev (ironiskt nog?) vald till Advertising Age:s Årets Marknadsförare, av marknadsförarna som närvarade på Association of National Advertisers årliga konferens i Orlando i oktober. Men man undrar om dessa CMO:s har fattat budskapet.

Eller, som en marknadsdirektör sa: ”Jag betraktar det som något vi alla kan dra lärdom av som marknadsförare. Att se vad han gjort: lyckats skapa ett socialt nätverk och göra det på ett sätt som gjorde det lätt för människor att engagera sig. Det var mycket enkelt för människor att delta.”

Och vad hände med ”Change”?